Mayor and Council

Crisis Changes Recycling

One year ago, China stopped accepting most American scrap plastic and cardboard - rejecting all but the cleanest, most conforming items - throwing a wrench into U.S. recycling programs. Now, cities and towns across the U.S. are dealing with piles of homeless plastic with no clear destination because markets for #4, #5, and #7 plastics are now almost non-existent and plastic bags are considered a contaminant. As a result, these items are in many cases leaving the recycling facility as trash and being landfilled. In the past 10 years Camden County, like many other places, started Single Stream Recycling, where residents combine all recyclable materials into one container for pickup. The Borough of Merchantville will continue to educate residents about effective, clean recycling measures. Recently, neighboring municipalities have experienced their recycling rejected due to contamination. Let’s all reduce how much plastic we use and remember, only plastic #1 & #2 can be placed in the blue bins. The following items should be placed in your curbside recycling container: Newspaper • mixed paper including junk mail • magazines • catalogs • school papers • office papers etc… • paper packaging • paperboard cartons for foods such as cereal boxes, pasta boxes and tissue boxes, etc… • softcover books • phone books • cardboard • glass bottles and jars • aluminum and steel cans • aluminum and steel lids • CLEAN CONTAINERS like Plastic bottles and jars with #1 or #2 found on the bottom • milk and juice cartons • paper towel and toilet paper inserts.

 

 

Boom Car Update

The thump thumping that keeps South Jersey folks up at night isn’t coming from under the bed. Residents living along a 20-mile stretch of riverfront towns from Burlington to Gloucester Counties have reported noise from what officials call “boom car” parties in Philadelphia on the weekends, usually from Saturday 11 p.m. until Sunday 5 a.m. Philadelphia police enforce the city’s noise ordinance, which includes quiet hours between 9 p.m. and 8 a.m. Those who violate city code face fines for a first-time offense between $100 and $300. Four or more offenses could cost $500 to $700. Yesterday, the Merchantville Police Department posted an advisory that the Philadelphia Police are aggressively addressing the "Boom Car" situation that is affecting the residents of New Jersey with the loud thumping noise. The lots in which the Boom Cars have been gathering have been locked down, The Philadelphia Police have also issued numerous citations to the offenders. If you hear the "thumping" coming from across the river, please contact The Philadelphia Police at (215) 686-3030

When in Doubt

When in doubt, THROW IT OUT. Beginning on July 26th, recycle cans in Merchantville will not be picked up if items such as, plastic bags, pizza boxes and plastics other than #1 and #2 are mixed in the can. Cans will be tagged and residents will receive a flyer on the can with the guidelines for items that can be recycled. Camden County wants to make single stream recycling easy and will only accept rinsed plastic or glass bottles, jars and jugs, rinsed aluminum and steel cans, clean paper, and clean cardboard.  If you are unsure if a piece is recyclable, just throw it out. For more information regarding the guidelines visit Camdencounty.com/recycling.

National Night Out

The Borough of Merchantville invites you to join the members of the Merchantville Police Department and the members of the Merchantville Fire Department for our annual National Night Out celebration. This years National Night Out will take place on August 6th from 6:00 - 8:00 p.m. at the Merchantville Community Center, 212 Somerset Street. National Night Out is an annual community-building campaign that promotes police-community partnerships and neighborhood camaraderie to make our neighborhoods safer, more caring places to live. National Night Out enhances the relationship between neighbors and law enforcement while bringing back a true sense of community. Furthermore, it provides a great opportunity to bring policemen, firemen and neighbors together under positive circumstances.

Mayor Addresses Flooding

On Monday, July 8th, Mayor and Council heard from residents of Glenwood Avenue about the continuing issue of street flooding. Reports of flooding on the 200 block of Glenwood Avenue in Merchantville can be found in newspapers as far back as 1938. In 1979, flooding along Glenwood and Holly Avenues was sited as issue and in 1989 Borough Engineers, Remington and Vernick, advised the municipality to increase the size of storm sewer pipes from 18" to 24"and replace the system of drainage pipes along the railroad embankment. In 1991 the Borough appropriated $25,000 in funds to enlarge the storm drains, then in 1992 an additional $22,800 to increase drain capacity caused by heavy storms. In 1995, Mayor Patrick Brennan announced an $85,00 contract with VPS, Inc. to solve years of flooding by relocating two storm pipes, installed in 1945 along the 200 block of Glenwood, to the Holly Road intersection; increasing the storm pipe size from 18" to 27"; and, creating more inlets to catch rainwater. Today, Mayor Ted Brennan sent a letter to the residents of Glenwood Avenue detailing actions taken to date, outlining plans to alleviate future issues, and announcing a follow up meeting in that neighborhood on August 6th.

 

 

Irrigation Tips

The MPWC has some tips for Smart Irrigation Month. Remember - using your irrigation system or gardening does increase water usage in the summer months. To help save water on your bill, we are sharing some water conservation tips when watering your lawn. Make sure the direction of your sprinkler covers the lawn and does not waste or spill out of your lawn. Plant shade trees to reduce overall temperatures and reduce water evaporation from soil. Also, it is helpful to keep a true timer when you water so it’s consistent and conservative.

New Chicken Ordinance

Borough Council will vote on replacing a pilot program ordinance for backyard chicken coops with a new ordinance on Monday, 7/8. The ordinance will increase the number of chickens allowed on each permit from four to eight, however roosters will not be permitted. Anyone who is currently licensed to have backyard chickens will keep that license. New licensees will be considered on an individual basis by the Chicken Advisory Board. A total of 25 permits will be allowed and coops must be 10 feet from the property line and no more than 6' high. 

Tips on Leaks

If your water bill is unusually high, but has not be estimated, there are a few things you can do to investigate the situation.  First, check for leaks. Small leaks can add up quickly. Just a 1/8-inch sized leak consumes more than 3,500 gallons per day. While most leaks are easy to find, others may be more difficult and can often be left undetected. Start by checking your toilets. Toilets can lose hundreds of gallons of water when leaking. The MPWC can provide you with special tablets for detecting toilet leaks free of charge. You can also put a few drops of food coloring in your toilet tank and wait a few minutes. If the color shows up in the bowl, you have a leak that needs to be repaired. Check indoor and outdoor faucets and replace worn gaskets and washers. Look for drip stains beneath and behind your dishwasher and washing machines. Check leaks in your sprinkler system, including damaged sprinkler heads.

Happy 4th of July

Independence Day, better known as the The Fourth of July, is a federal holiday in the United States commemorating the Declaration of Independence of the United States on July 4, 1776. The Continental Congress declared that the thirteen American colonies were no longer subject, and subordinate, to the monarch of Britain and were now united, free, and independent states. The Congress had voted to declare independence two days earlier, on July 2, but it was not declared until July 4. Independence Day is commonly associated with fireworks, parades, barbecues, carnivals, fairs, picnics, concerts, baseball games, family reunions, and political speeches and ceremonies, in addition to various other public and private events celebrating the history, government, and traditions of the United States. Independence Day is the National Day of the United States.

Heat Advisory 7/2 - 7/6

Holiday Schedules

Thursday, July 4th is a Borough Holiday. Borough offices will be closed and reopen during regular summer hours on Friday, July 5th from 8:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. West side (properties from Center Street westward to West End Avenue) trash collection - bulky items, garbage and recycling - will take place on Saturday, July 6th. Wednesday, July 3rd and 17th are yard waste collection dates for the East side (properties from Center Street eastward to Ivins Avenue) of town, and July 10th and 24th for the West side. You can sign up for Recycle Coach or get the App to receive up-to-date information and notices about municipal trash collection.

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